It's important to know how to prepare and submit your mixes so you can get the best sound for your songs. The engineer Ciro Visone wants to start  with a clean slate, primarily on the master bus and will need to have the proper file type and format to get the most from your music.  As you go through your mix eliminate any noise or pops that may be in each track. Use fades as necessary to cut out any spots that may just be  containing recorded noise. If this is done in the mix stage within each track it will keep the overall noise level down when the mastering engineer  begins to equalize and compresses the mix.   Overusing processors especially dynamic processors (compressors) on the master bus can destroy a mix and make it difficult, if not impossible for  the mastering engineer to make a great master. Unless there's a specific sound of a master bus processor desired for the mix, it's best to keep the  master buss free of outboard processing or plugins. If master bus processing is used make sure to notify the mastering engineer of its type and  settings. Your maximum peaks should be located between -6dbfs and -3dbfs.  There should never be a limiter set on the master bus. Final dynamic control and level should be left to the mastering engineer.  The two most popular file types for mastering are: .WAV and .AIFF. Both of these file types are lossless (non-compresses/converted), and either file  type is excellent for a mastering engineer to work with. AIFF files are normally used on Mac systems while WAV files are traditionally PC. Make sure  your mastering studio is able to work with the format you have.  Additional to using .WAV or .AIFF file types. When submitting a mix for mastering. The file should be kept in the same resolution as it was mixed in  (no down conversions). The favourite format is WAV file at 24 Bit - 44.1 kHz  For Example: A song mixed at 24bit - 44.1 kHz should be submitted as a 24bit - 44.1 kHz file (.WAV or .AIFF)   Submitting any previously done mixes or masters of the song/s to be worked on, along with a few different reference songs that have a similar  sound desired is excellent for giving the mastering engineer an idea of your musical vision. This could be a reference to bands who inspire you, or  who have a similar sound you like.  Mastering from stems is becoming a more common practice. This is where the mix is consolidated into a number of stereo stems (subgroups) to be  submitted individually. For example you might have different tracks for Drums, Bass, Keys, Guitars, Vocal, and Background Vocal's. This gives the  mastering engineer excellent control over the mix and master, allowing for the absolute best sound possible. However, it's a substantially more  involved process. If a mix from stems is desired, following the same steps listed above is best for each stem.  “I never get tired of saying that behind of a great master, there is always a great mix, love your mixes and work hard on them,  the end result will always be superior. If you already have a good or great sounding mix, here you can find some basic tips in  order to prepare the files before you send them at the studio.” Ciro. 
HOW TO PREPARE YOUR TRACK FOR CIRO VISONE AUDIO MASTERING
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